“Start creating your own OERs” Workshop at the eTwinning Conference 2016

From 27 to 29 October 2016, the eTwinning and Digital Citizenship Annual Conference was held in Athens. The goal of the conference was to explore possibilities on how to raise the capabilities of the schools of today, in order to be prepared for the challenges of the fully digital society of tomorrow.

Professor Elena Shulman, expert member of EUN’s LangOER team, was responsible for the activity entitled Open Educational Resources: Start creating your own OERs, organized as 2 separate workshops taking place on the same day. These sessions were aimed at teachers engaged in professional development activities under the eTwinning programme.

Around 70 participants from a wide variety of European countries (including Italy, Netherlands, Finland, Moldova, Ukraine, Turkey, Lithuania and Portugal among others) joined the LangOER workshops. The expert, answered questions throughout the sessions and engaged teachers in considering and discussing issues around OER, copyright and best practices for creating and licensing their own OERs.

The workshop’s topic was based in the Going Open with LangOER online OER course, the related handbook and other relevant tools and resources. The first part of the session, focused on providing an overview of Creative Commons licenses and examples of open resources and how to find them. Then, the speaker went on presenting opportunities for teachers to explore resources and tools that facilitate their own efforts to discover, reuse and create their own OERs and to license these resources appropriately using Creative Commons licenses. The hands-on part of the workshop was followed by a questions & answers slot and the final wrap up.

Overall, participants provided feedback to the expert on the issues that teachers found challenging when it comes to Creative Commons licenses, the type of resources teachers were more likely to find useful in similar learning opportunities and insight into what motivates or acts as barriers to teacher’s willingness to share OERs in online communities.

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